Aerial Video Systems provides the wireless links for the first Los Angeles Marathon in HD
Wednesday, 24 March 2010 08:28

On Sunday, March 21, 2010, Aerial Video Systems (AVS) continued their long-running tradition of providing the wireless camera feeds for the Los Angeles Marathon.  There were three significant firsts marking the 25th annual LA Marathon.

 2010 LA Marathon Lead Elite Females

First, this year’s race took a new “straight-line” approach.  Appropriately called the “Stadium to the Sea” route, this year’s course started at Dodger Stadium, wound through scenic Los Angeles, Hollywood, and Beverly Hills, ultimately concluding at the beach in Santa Monica.

For the first time, the broadcast was carried by KTLA-5 in Los Angeles.

Not only did the broadcast have a new course and a new broadcast home, this year marked the first time the LA Marathon was delivered in native HD.  In order to accomplish this, AVS utilized the latest technology from Link Research and MRC.   The Link HD/SD L1500 and MRC PTX-Pro microwave systems transmitted both video and audio signals from custom equipped Honda Ridgeline pickups to repeater-equipped helicopters hovering overhead.  The signals were then transmitted from the helicopters to a terrestrial receive site in the Hollywood Hills, where they were turned around and re-transmitted to KTLA in Hollywood.

 This year also marked the 7th annual “LA Marathon Challenge”, which provides the elite women with an approximately 18 minute head start over the elite men.  The time differential sets up a dramatic race to the finish line between the elite men and women with the winner picking up a bonus of $100,000 in prize money.

 To follow progress and excitement of the Challenge, AVS employed the next generation 3D GPS driven marathon course map plotting the exact locations of the lead female and male runners and their relative positions to each other.   This allows the viewing audience to experience the drama of the Challenge and the fight to the finish line while getting a much more detailed look at the runners’ surroundings.  “The added detail of the new 3D map really brings the map to life, showing the elevation changes that the runners have to contend with.” said Herb Chapin the designer of the tracking program.  This 3D GPS tracking system is a proprietary technology of AVS and developed specifically for the LA Marathon.

 The 2010 L.A. Marathon was broadcast live on KTLA-5 and a tape delayed broadcast was carried on Universal Sports, which is carried via cable by more than 45 million homes across the nation.

 

 
Aerial Video Systems Supports First Native HD Marathon
Monday, 28 December 2009 12:25
By: Carolyn Braff, Managing Editor | Sports Video Group | Published: December 22, 2009

Aerial Video Systems has been supporting the coverage of marathons since the company was founded in 1981, but on Sunday, Dec. 6, AVS took that coverage another mile. The company provided wireless HD camera links for the first successful native HD marathon production, the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon in Las Vegas, which aired live on KLAS-Las Vegas. The HD production utilized only terrestrial receive sites for all 26.2 miles.

“We’ve been able to do HD for four or five years now,” explains Randy Hermes, owner of AVS. “If the opportunity had come earlier, we would have done it earlier, but no one had wanted to pay for it before this.”

Bringing the cost down for the December production was new software and technology from Link Research and MRC. Link HD/SD 1500 microwave systems transmitted both video and audio signals from custom-equipped pickup trucks to receive sites located at The Hotel at Mandalay Bay and The Stratosphere. Each rooftop utilized four antenna diversity receivers with maximum ratio combining, one each for the lead female runner and lead male runner.

The receive sites were linked via microwave, using a new long-delay packet switching feature from Link Technology. That feature allowed AVS to “daisy chain” the receivers from both sites, creating a temporary cellular diversity system to automatically capture the signals from all eight antennas.

“On a normal system, you have a receiver that has four antennas, which is a complete diversity system” Hermes explains. “It combines the signals, picks the best, gets rid of the bad, and sends it out. We took that signal and hopped it over to the Stratosphere, where we had four more antennas.”

However, rather than merely switching between the two receive sites, as had been done in the past, AVS set up true diversity switching of the ASI feeds from all of the antennas on both sites.

“The system could have used one antenna from Mandalay and one antenna from Stratosphere, if those were the two best antennas, and made a signal out of it,” Hermes says. “In other words, there was no manual switching whatsoever. Complete diversity, eight antennas hooked together via microwave – that had not been done before.”

Once all of the signals were collected, the HD feeds from the lead female runner and lead male runner were then mixed together to form a single ASI stream, which was transmitted to the KLAS studio on a single microwave channel. At the studio, the stream was decoded back into the two individual HD signals.

“There’s always a problem with frequencies, so we wanted to use every bit of technology to make it work, and serve as a test, also,” Hermes says. “We could have done it much easier and safer by putting two paths up and sending two paths down from the last hop, one with the male and one with the female, but I wanted to take it to the next step, test ourselves, and see how much stuff we could jam in there.”

The Las Vegas Marathon utilized a staggered start, giving the elite women a 20-minute head start over the elite men, with the hopes of creating a dramatic foot race finish. To highlight that aspect of the race, KLAS utilized AVS’ GPS-driven marathon course map to plot the locations of the lead runners and their positions relative to one another. The result was picture perfect.

“We had 95 percent coverage, so the show was pretty perfect,” Hermes says. “The only challenge was logistics, getting all the people and equipment in all the different places it needs to be.”

 
AVS goes the distance with the Los Angeles Marathon
Tuesday, 23 June 2009 17:07

Aerial Video Systems

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Monday, May 25, 2009, Memorial Day morning, Aerial Video Systems (AVS) continued their long-running tradition of providing the wireless camera feeds for KNBC4–LA’s live broadcast of the Los Angeles Marathon. For the production of the 24th annual LA Marathon, AVS utilized the latest technology from Link Research and MRC. The Link HD/SD 1500 and MRC PTX-Pro microwave systems transmitted both video and audio signals from custom designed motorcycle sidecars to helicopter-based repeaters and back to a receive site in the Hollywood Hills, where it was returned via fiber to Mira Mobile’s M-6 53’ digital expando truck.

This year, race organizers changed the date from the usual Sunday morning in March to Memorial Day. Although a holiday, the local news operations were in full swing with their regularly scheduled Monday morning programming. This situation prevented the broadcasters from sharing their 2GHz frequencies with AVS and created a lack of frequency options in an already frequency-challenged market. Pulling from its inventory of Link and MRC microwave gear, AVS carefully selected strategic frequencies in the 1.4, 2.0, 2.5 and 7.0 GHz bands to deliver crystal clear images. “The RF coverage was outstanding,” stated Phil Olsman, Executive Producer of the L.A. Marathon for NBC.

This year marked the 6th annual “LA Marathon Challenge”, which provides the elite women with an approximately 20 minute head start over the elite men. The time differential sets up a dramatic race to the finish between the male and female athletes with the winner picking up a bonus prize of $100,000.

To capture the progress and excitement of the challenge, AVS developed a GPS-driven marathon course map, plotting the exact locations of the lead female and male runners and their relative positions to one another. This allows the viewing audience to experience the drama of the challenge and the fight to the finish line. “This keeps the viewers involved throughout the three-hour broadcast,” said Herb Chapin the designer of the tracking program. This GPS tracking system is a proprietary technology of AVS and was developed specifically for the LA Marathon.

The 2009 L.A. Marathon was broadcast live on KNBC4-LA and streamed live on-line at nbcla.com. A tape delayed broadcast was carried on Universal Sports, which is available one cable for more than 45 million homes across the nation.

 
AVS HD RF at the Academy Awards®
Sunday, 01 March 2009 12:46

For the first time in its history, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences incorporated wireless cameras in to the Academy Awards® broadcast. The Academy called upon Aerial Video Systems (AVS) to bring its innovative microwave technology to help capture the excitement and glamor of the evening.

AVS, based in Burbank, California, provided six HD microwave system packages. Two of the systems covered the stars’ arrival during the Red Carpet show with the other four systems dedicated to the main show inside the Kodak Theatre. With the new seating configuration and a faster-paced production format, the HD RF camera systems provided the mobility necessary to bring television viewers up close and personal. The untethered cameras performed flawlessly throughout the venue and brought unique, never-before-seen angles to the Academy Awards Show.

AVS HD Wireless at the Academy Awards Red Carpet

Coverage of the Red Carpet show required two HD RF Steadicams. AVS coupled its Link HD 1500 microwave systems, operating at 2.3 GHz, to two Thomson LDK-6000 World Cams with Canon HJ11X4.7 wide-angle lenses and Viper short backs. AVS also used its 5.8 GHz Digi-Snap system for the RF prompter feeds.

For the main show inside the Kodak Theatre, AVS joined two of its Link 1500 7 GHz microwave systems and two 1.4 GHz systems to the Denali-provided Sony HDC-1500 cameras. Two of the cameras were dedicated to Steadicam rigs and the other two were hand-held. AVS provided return video, prompter systems, and, via Denali’s stock CCU, full camera control. To significantly improve transmission quality, AVS coordinated frequencies to accommodate 20 MHz of bandwidth for each of the four RF paths.

AVS Technology Rack at the Academy Awards AVS utilized their proprietary RF-Over-Fiber systems to transport all RF signals to and from the Red Carpet and the theatre. This method enabled the receivers to be located at the side of each of the mobile units which simplified AVS’s integration into the production.

“The pictures from the RF cameras were spectacular. We had flawless coverage the entire week, whether the cameras were on or off air,” said Tad Scripter, the engineer in charge of the telecast.

 

 
AVS Hits Homerun With 7 Ghz HD RF
Wednesday, 14 May 2008 07:42

AVS HD Wireless


When 115,300 baseball fans jammed into the Los Angeles Coliseum in March to watch the Boston Red Sox play the Dodgers to commemorate the team’s 50th anniversary in Los Angeles, a 7GHz Link Research microwave system delivered HD images of the event for KCAL-TV.

Working with Aerial Video Systems (AVS), the Los Angeles station needed an HD RF camera system to capture the excitement of the fans and beauty shots from high up in the coliseum for its coverage of the exhibition game.

AVS assembled a package that included a Thomson LDK-6000 camera with the Viper short back coupled with a Canon HJ11x4.7 wide-angle lens. Live microwave transmission from the camera was done with the Link Research 7GHz Link HD system, and camera control was handled with the Thomson standard OCP. AVS also provided control for a Sony HDC-1500 camera through the standard Sony CCU panel.

 (As published in Broadcast Engineering)

As a side note, the World Series champion Boston Red Sox beat the LA Dodgers 7 to 4.
 
 
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next > End >>

Page 5 of 6
Ninthwall